The Manaia


On the side of the building in Whangarei is this quirky odd looking mural named "The Manaia" which was painted for the Whangarei Street Arts Festival. In Maori culture it symbolizes a mythological creature believed to be the messenger between the earthly world of mortals and the domain of the spirits. It was painted by Brazilian artist Mateus Bailon who was born in Santa Catarina when he visited New Zealand.  

Linking up with Mural Monday.

Comments

Tigger said…
Interesting that no one has accused him of 'cultural appropriation'. He can paint whatever he likes but can he call it manaia? It's very good and and I like it very much. Author Philip Pullman called the spirit guides in his Book of Dust dæmons. I'd been told that manaia has the head of a bird, the body of man, and the tail of a fish. In this way it binds us, air, land and water.
local alien said…
Just look at that dragon. Amazing artwork!
Andy said…
Spectacular mural. The artist has talent.
Tom said…
...I like it!
Sharon said…
I like it a lot.
NatureFootstep said…
wow, I´d say that´s one flowerful creature :) Love it :)
Mae Travels said…
Inviting a Brazilian artist to paint a traditional Maori figure does seem very strange. It is a wonderful composition, though.

best.... mae at maefood.blogspot.com
William Kendall said…
It is eye catching.
kwarkito said…
a wonderful dragon. thanks for sharing this
Regardless of the strangeness, this is a beautifully created mural. Nicely done.
Bertiebo said…
That is a beautiful painting. And it's nice that you tell the meaning
Iris Flavia said…
Like your new banner, especially the two people (Dad and kid?) on the board.
Great mural, too. I like the idea as well.
Sami said…
I'm with Mae, strange that a Brazilian artist would paint a traditional Maori figure, but he had done a great job! So much detail!
Thanks for participating in Monday Murals Amy.
A very interesting story to go with the fascinating creature I sure wouldn't have understood it without your words, so thank you very much for that! I love learning.