Tuesday, 20 April 2021

Share with care


 I love finding little things like this that pop out of nowhere on my travels. Seen on a footpath in Taupo it apparently is a Maori proverb that means "love given, love returned" and is a timely reminder in this day and age of how we treat each other. 

After Prince Philip's death and how his family came together on the day of his funeral it got me thinking about my own ancestors. Obviously the royals knew/know each other pretty well but I don't have alot of information about those who came before me except for immediate grandparents/great grandparents etc so I've started typing up kind of like a memorandum of my life, thoughts and what I've found out so far on my genealogy journey. Hopefully after I've gone, whenever that happens, my children will be able to have something of me that tells a story of my life.  Over the last 2 days I have been feeling a bit blah, not sure if it's the change of season or what and we don't watch a great deal of what's on the television (it's usually rubbish anyway) so we search for interesting things to watch on youtube - we found this one yesterday, makes me grateful for where we live and for having access to medicine, see what you think:


Linking up with Our World TuesdayThrough my lensTuesday TreasuresTravel TuesdayMy Corner of the World and Wordless Wednesday.

18 comments:

  1. We are amazingly lucky to live in countries with decent medical facilities and good educational possibilities too. I think that all too often they are taken for granted.

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  2. It seems that everybody is so spread out that it is hard to learn one's ancestors.

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  3. Interesting image - it makes me think.
    Thanks for sharing at https://image-in-ing.blogspot.com/2021/04/north-carolinas-pollen-season.html

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  4. That is a simple proverb that says so much. A good saying to live by.

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  5. Like you I have no info.. not much at least, other that I am half-Prussian (now Russian!) and my Grandma yelled ach-oi-ach-oi (oh my god!) rolling over my little brother with her bike, LOL. OK, there is a bit more, but this I´ll never forget! I was in front and just heard the crash - I can laugh cause no one was hurt.
    I´ll save the docu for tonight, thank you :-)

    Yes, sad we have not much info on where we came from.
    Only war-related things I do not want to know, really (none was a Na#i / in the army, "I" am free of that at least!).

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  6. I'm exploring a bit of my family history but sadly I have no younger generation to pass it on to. Still finding it rather interesting for myself, though!

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  7. I'm beginning to wonder whether every generation when they reach a certain age or stage of life start to ask those questions. In my family it was oral tradition, but it only goes back to those who arrived in NZ. It is accompanied by some photos of which I am the current caretaker, but I have no children so am very conscious that I need make an effort to pass on the stories (if anyone of the younger generations is interested), as they won't come up in casual day to day conversation and over the dinner table chit chat.

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  8. We are indeed blessed ~ wonderful post and 'the blahs' will pass ~ XX

    Living moment by moment,

    A ShutterBug Explores,
    aka (A Creative Harbor)

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  9. We have a television show here called Finding Your Roots about searching the backgrounds of certain people. I love that show and I really want to did deeper into my roots.

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  10. Always interesting to find out a bit more about our ancestors Amy and yes, how lucky arcade to live where we do when you see how people live in 2nd World countries. Hope you're still not feeling bleh 💜

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  11. To find our ancestors today is hard because people move around a lot. I'm still trying to find my ancestors over here in Ireland and having a tough time.

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  12. What a lovely, positive message on the road.

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  13. ..."love given, love returned" sounds good to me! Somehow we have to treat each other better!

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  14. In the "old days" I used to spend hours in the local library poring over microfiches to discover more about my forebears. Today most information is available online - so much easier! Good luck with your search, it is a fascinating journey to see where you came from.

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  15. We subscribe to Acorn TV service and get several NZ (and English and Australian) shows which we enjoy! But spending more time at home lately. I ve been watching stuff on YouTube too, something I never even looked at before this pandemic. We do have a lot of choices these days for in home entertainment. ..... hope you feel better soon.

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  16. What a great sidewalk message.

    Your link at 'My Corner of the World' this week is a wonderful addition!

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  17. A cousin tried to chart our family tree but gave up -- we were too scattered across the globe and the elders who knew are now either demented or dropping dead one by one.

    Good luck with your search, Amy!

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